Horses

Colors & Markings

  • Bay: Reddish brown or dark brown horse with black ‘points’ (mane, tail, and legs)
  • Black: True black has black skin and no brown or red tint whatsoever in the coat
  • Blaze: A wide white stripe starting at the forehead and extending down the face
  • Chestnut (Red): Reddish-brown body with reddish-brown ‘points’. Palominos have golden coats with silver or cream-colored manes and tails. The rare cremello is a cream or white color all over, with blue eyes and pink skin.
  • Dun: Has a lightened coat color and ’dun factors – dorsal stripe, face mask (dark muzzle and ears), leg bars (also known as tiger striping or zebra striping).
  • Gray: Born black, bay, or chestnut; its coat turns white as it ages.
  • Mealy: Almost any color with a coat that lightens to a light or white underside, with white hairs around the eyes and muzzle.
  • Medicine Hat: White with colored ears (a ‘war bonnet’). Highly prized by Indians, who believe they have supernatural powers.
  • Palouse (Appaloosa): Spotted coat, sometimes with a distinctive ‘blanket’ over the rump, usually with colored spots amid the white. Other characteristics include white sclera (the eye around the iris) and striped hooves.
  • Pied: General term for spotted horses, regardless of pattern.
  • Pinto: Large patches of white and color on the body.
  • Roan: A coat dusted with white hairs, the coat a ‘salt & pepper’ or ‘cinnamon & sugar’ appearance over the body. A roan’s mane and tail may be solid or mixed with streaks of white or gray.
  • White: Most white horses are actually grays that have turned white. True white horses are rare. Whit from birth, with pink skin, blue eyes, and white hooves. They are not albino and suffer no problems associated with the disorder.

Other Horse Terms

Horses

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